The term “personally identified information” is utilized by some industry groups, including the Network Advertising Initiative (“NAI”).  Personally identified information, or “PII,” is defined by such organizations to refer to a significantly narrower set of data than the term “personal information” used within the CCPA.  The following provides a side-by-side comparison of the two terms:

Yes and no.

The CCPA references directly, or by incorporating definitions from other code provisions, 55 data types that may fall under the broad definition of “personal information.”  While the CCPA does not label any data type as being more, or less, sensitive than another, the Act does confer special rights on a subset of

On Aug. 30, 2020, the California legislature passed Assembly Bill 1281 (AB-1281), which would extend the exemptions for “employee” information and business-to-business (B2B) transactions from its original expiration date of Jan. 1, 2021, to Jan. 1, 2022, if approved by the governor.

Read the full GT Alert, “Extension to CCPA’s Employment and

On August 14, 2020, the California Attorney General (AG) announced that the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) approved the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations, which will take effect immediately. The OAL’s approval concludes the expedited review process requested by the AG on June 1. For more information on the review process, see GT’s June

It has been a busy time for the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)—enforcement begins July 1st, final implementing regulations have been submitted for approval, and qualifying signatures for a wide-ranging “CCPA v2.0” ballot initiative are in the process of being counted.

Yet the effect of the CCPA on digital advertising, mobile applications and websites remains

On June 24, the California Secretary of State announced that the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) has qualified as a statewide ballot initiative to be listed on this November’s General Election ballot.

The announcement follows official confirmation that the nonprofit group behind the ballot initiative, Californians for Consumer Privacy, obtained in excess of the 623,212

Following much anticipation, the Office of the California Attorney General (OAG) moved one step closer to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)’s wide-ranging implementing regulations becoming enforceable by law by filing the final CCPA Regulations with the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL) on June 1.

The CCPA grants the OAG the authority to begin