Greenberg Traurig Data Privacy & Cybersecurity Shareholders Dr. Viola Bensinger and Carsten Kociok will present the CLE webinar, “The EU Data Act: data sharing, interoperability and other obligations for providers of cloud services and other data processing services,” on Thursday, May 2, 2024.

This webinar will guide participants through the regulatory landscape of the

On 13 March 2024, the European Parliament adopted the AI Act. Since the EU Commission presented its first draft almost three years ago, the use of AI and general purpose AI models has increased significantly. Hence, the regulatory proposal was (and still is) the subject of hefty debate.

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  1. Cybersecurity Rules by the SEC and the EU – Both the Security and Exchange Commission’s public company cybersecurity disclosure and breach notification rules as well as the implementation of the EU NIS 2 Directive will drive increased focus from management and the board on cybersecurity risks, preventive measures, and incident response. Expect to see another

Greenberg Traurig Shareholders Reena Bajowala and David Zetoony, Co-Chair of the firm’s U.S. Data Privacy & Cybersecurity Practice, will present the MyLawCLE and Federal Bar Association webinar, “Artificial Intelligence and Data Privacy: The current (and often hidden) United States and European framework for regulating AI,” Wednesday, Oct. 4 at 11 a.m. CT.

Not necessarily. 

Under the GDPR, controllers are required to provide information relating to what personal data they process, and how that processing takes place. 

If the personal data the organization includes in AI prompts has been collected directly from individuals, those individuals should be provided with a copy of the organization’s privacy notice “at the

Under the GDPR, controllers are required to provide individuals with information relating to what personal data is processed, and how that processing takes place. Some supervisory authorities have specifically taken the position that organizations which use personal data to train an artificial intelligence (AI) must draft and publish a privacy notice that provides “data subjects

Data is typically needed to train and fine-tune modern artificial intelligence (AI) models. AI can use data—including personal information—to recognize patterns and predict results.

The GDPR permits controllers to process personal information if one (or more) of the following six lawful processing purposes applies:[1]

  1. Consent. A company may process personal information if it collects

Probably not.

Under the European GDPR, if the personal information that an organization is going to use as part of training an AI has been collected directly from individuals, then those individuals should be provided with a copy of the organization’s privacy notice “at the time when personal data are obtained.”[1] If the personal

Attorneys familiar with the European GDPR are acquainted with the bifurcation of the world into controllers and processors. For purposes of European data privacy, a “controller” refers to a company that either jointly or alone “determines the purposes and means” of how personal data will be processed.[1] A “processor” refers to a company (or

Greenberg Traurig Shareholder David Zetoony, Co-Chair of the U.S. Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice, will be a panelist during the webinar, “Intersection of Privacy Laws and AI,” Wednesday, Aug. 16 at 12:00 p.m. CT. The webinar will feature privacy professionals exploring the complexities presented by artificial intelligence.

Topics include: 

  • Privacy issues arising from