Skip to content
Photo of David A. Zetoony

David Zetoony, Co-Chair of the firm's U.S. Data, Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice, focuses on helping businesses navigate data privacy and cyber security laws from a practical standpoint. David has helped hundreds of companies establish and maintain ongoing privacy and security programs, and he has defended corporate privacy and security practices in investigations initiated by the Federal Trade Commission, and other data privacy and security regulatory agencies around the world, as well as in class action litigation.

The regulations implementing the CCPA require that a business verify the identity of a consumer that submits a specific-information access request to a “reasonably high degree of certainty.”[1] The regulations provide as an example matching three pieces of personal information provided by the consumer with three pieces of personal information maintained by the business

The CCPA and its implementing regulations identify six types of information requests that a consumer can submit to a business. As the first five requests ask that a business respond with broad information about the type of information collected (as opposed to the actual information itself), they are often referred to as category-level access requests.

In order to help businesses understand and benchmark industry practice, Greenberg Traurig attorneys analyzed the publicly available privacy policies of companies within the Fortune 500.[1] As of October 2022 – nearly two years after the CCPA took effect – 71% of companies had updated their privacy policies to account for the CCPA.[2] It

The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, as well as state procedural rules, permit parties to a lawsuit to conduct discovery, in search of information and documents that may be relevant to the litigation. Parties can issue requests for documents, information (called interrogatories), and admissions of fact to other parties to the lawsuit; parties may use

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June 2021.

  • Background. Company A is an EEA controller that utilizes Company Z, a processor based in Country Q. Company Z does not have a legal presence

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June 2021.

  • Background. Company A is an EEA controller that utilizes Company Z, a processor based in Country Q. Company Z does not have a legal presence

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June 2021.

  • Background. Company A is an EEA controller that utilizes Company Z, a processor based in Country Q. Company Z does not have a legal presence

The California Consumer Privacy Act and the California Privacy Rights Act specifically state that they do not restrict a business’s ability to collect, use, retain, sell, share, or disclose “aggregated consumer information.”[1] Aggregate consumer information is defined as “information that relates to a group or category of consumers, from which individual consumer identities have

The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, as well as state procedural rules, permit parties to a lawsuit to conduct discovery, in search of information and documents that may be relevant to the litigation. Parties can issue requests for documents, information (called interrogatories), and admissions of fact to other parties to the lawsuit; parties may use

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June 2021.

Visual Description and Implications
Background. Company A retains Company Z in Country Q to process personal data (e.g., collect personal data from data subjects). Company