The regulations implementing the CCPA require that a business verify the identity of a consumer that submits a specific-information access request to a “reasonably high degree of certainty.”[1] The regulations provide as an example matching three pieces of personal information provided by the consumer with three pieces of personal information maintained by the business

The CCPA and its implementing regulations identify six types of information requests that a consumer can submit to a business. As the first five requests ask that a business respond with broad information about the type of information collected (as opposed to the actual information itself), they are often referred to as category-level access requests.

In order to help businesses understand and benchmark industry practice, Greenberg Traurig attorneys analyzed the publicly available privacy policies of companies within the Fortune 500.[1] As of October 2022 – nearly two years after the CCPA took effect – 71% of companies had updated their privacy policies to account for the CCPA.[2] It

Jan. 1 is approaching, and with it comes new requirements under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CPRA) and the Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act (VCDPA). What should you and your company be focusing on to ensure you are prepared for the looming compliance deadline? This Data Privacy Dish post offers end-of-year considerations for closing out

The California Consumer Privacy Act and the California Privacy Rights Act specifically state that they do not restrict a business’s ability to collect, use, retain, sell, share, or disclose “aggregated consumer information.”[1] Aggregate consumer information is defined as “information that relates to a group or category of consumers, from which individual consumer identities have

After Europe blazed the trail by passing the sweeping General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) in 2016, California followed closely in the footsteps of European efforts by passing the most comprehensive data privacy law in the United States, the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “CCPA”). Effective January 1, 2020, the CCPA provided a number of obligations

GT Shareholders Gretchen A. Ramos and Darren Abernethy will lead a webinar hosted by the Association of Corporate Counsel titled “Website and Mobile App Compliance Under the CPRA and New State Privacy Laws Effective in 2023” Oct. 6 at 11 a.m. PDT.

Starting Jan. 1, 2023, the California Privacy Rights Act and the CPRA

Some modern data privacy statutes require organizations to consider and document privacy-related risks regarding certain types of processing activities. These assessments are sometimes referred to as “data protection assessments” or “data protection impact assessments” (generically a DPIA). DPIAs are intended to make an organization identify and weigh the benefits that may flow from processing personal

Some modern data privacy statutes require organizations to consider and document privacy-related risks regarding certain types of processing activities. These assessments are sometimes referred to as “data protection assessments” or “data protection impact assessments” (generically a DPIA). For example, several state data privacy statutes mandate that a DPIA be conducted if an organization intends to

On July 8, 2022, the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) released proposed regulations to implement the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”). The new proposals would dramatically change the existing regulations that apply to organizations that do business in California.

Click here to read the full article, published by the Washington Legal Foundation Aug. 19, 2022.