Greenberg Traurig is a sponsor of the 2023 Privacy + Security Forum Fall Academy at the George Washington University Nov. 8-10, 2023. The conference will break down the silos of privacy and security and bring together seasoned thought leaders for in-depth sessions and workshops designed to deliver practical takeaways for conference participants.

Greenberg Traurig Shareholder

Probably not.

Most modern state privacy laws attempt to carve out organizations that process de minimis amounts of personal information, or whose business activities do not monetize data. While the specific thresholds differ between states, many of the new statutes only apply to organizations that control or process personal information relating to at least 100,000

Greenberg Traurig Shareholders Reena Bajowala and David Zetoony, Co-Chair of the firm’s U.S. Data Privacy & Cybersecurity Practice, will present the MyLawCLE and Federal Bar Association webinar, “Artificial Intelligence and Data Privacy: The current (and often hidden) United States and European framework for regulating AI,” Wednesday, Oct. 4 at 11 a.m. CT.

Most modern U.S. data privacy statutes require companies to allow data subjects to opt out of having their personal information (PI) used for targeted advertising. As the following chart indicates, the term “targeted advertising” is defined consistently between and among most state statutes with the notable exception of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and

The term “targeted advertising” is defined relatively consistently between and among modern U.S. data privacy statutes with the notable exception of California which deviates somewhat in the California Privacy Rights Act’s (CPRA) definition of the similar term “cross-context behavioral advertising” by omitting any reference to tracking a person over time or making predictions about a

Categorizing data as “sensitive” is a common feature in U.S. state privacy law, as well as the EU’s GDPR (which uses the term “special category” for similar personal data).[1] What is considered sensitive data varies from state to state, as well as the obligations that come with it. Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, Montana, Oregon

Following on the heels of a California Superior Court’s last minute ruling that stayed enforcement of the revised California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations, as previously discussed on this blog, California’s data privacy regulators have responded in ways that confirm they are more committed than ever to holding businesses accountable for alleged violations

On June 6, 2023, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed into law SB 262, which grants Florida consumers certain rights relating to the processing of their personal data by businesses. Parts of SB 262 will come into effect in 2023.

This blog post aims to interpret the types of entities and individuals that will be

On April 17, 2023, the Washington State Legislature passed the “My Health My Data Act” (“WMHMDA” or “Act”). Unlike other modern state privacy laws that purport to regulate any collection of “personal data,” WMHMDA confers privacy protections only upon “Consumer Health Data.” While the Act was promoted as a measure to help protect