The Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act (GLBA) and its implementing regulations impose privacy requirements when financial institutions collect “nonpublic personal information about individuals who obtain financial products or services primarily for personal, family, or household purposes.”[1] GLBA does not apply, however, when a financial institution collects information about individuals “who obtain financial products or services for business,

Colorado is the third state, after California and Virginia, to get a comprehensive data privacy statute through its legislature. While the Colorado Privacy Act (CPA) awaits signature by Gov. Polis, businesses are assessing to what extent the CPA will impact their privacy programs.

The following provides a high-level cross-reference to help companies compare and contrast

Colorado is the third state, after California and Virginia, to get a comprehensive data privacy statute through its legislature. While the Colorado Privacy Act (CPA) awaits signature by Governor Polis, businesses are assessing to what extent the CPA will impact their privacy programs.

The following provides a high-level cross-reference to help companies compare and contrast

Colorado is the third state, after California and Virginia, to get a comprehensive data privacy statute through its legislature. While the Colorado Privacy Act (CPA) awaits signature by Governor Polis, businesses are assessing to what extent the CPA will impact their privacy programs.

The following provides a high-level cross-reference to help companies compare and contrast

Colorado is the third state, after California and Virginia, to get a comprehensive data privacy statute through its legislature. While the Colorado Privacy Act (CPA) awaits signature by Governor Polis, businesses are assessing to what extent the CPA will impact their privacy programs.

The following provides a high-level cross-reference to help companies that are currently