The CCPA Regulations require that businesses that buy, receive, sell, or share personal information about more than 10 million Californians disclose metrics within their privacy notices regarding the speed with which they respond to the data subject requests that they received in the previous calendar year. Among other things, businesses must report the average or

This article was originally posted by IAPP here. Reprinted with permission.

In July, the office of the attorney general of California marked the one-year anniversary of its enforcement of the California Consumer Privacy Act by issuing a press release to tout its “successful enforcement efforts.” Also well-publicized, in the same announcement, the office unveiled

The CCPA Regulations require that businesses that buy, receive, sell, or share personal information about more than 10 million Californians disclose metrics within their privacy notices regarding the speed with which they respond to the data subject requests that they received in the previous calendar year. Among other things, businesses must report the average or

The CCPA Regulations require that businesses that buy, receive, sell, or share personal information about more than 10 million Californians disclose metrics within their privacy notices regarding the quantity of data subject requests that they received in the previous calendar year. Among other things, businesses must publicly report the number of access requests that the

The CCPA Regulations require that businesses that buy, receive, sell, or share personal information about more than 10 million Californians disclose metrics within their privacy notices regarding the quantity of data subject requests that they received in the previous calendar year. Among other things, businesses must publicly report the number of access requests that the

The CCPA Regulations require that businesses that buy, receive, sell, or share personal information about more than 10 million Californians disclose metrics within their privacy notices regarding the quantity of data subject requests that they received in the previous calendar year. Specifically, businesses must publicly report:

  • The number of access requests that the business received,

In most contexts, employees should have a low expectation of privacy in the workplace. Their computers, desks, and other common areas may be subject to strict company control and their conduct subject to workplace policies. But as we will discuss in an upcoming two-part series on The Performance Review (Greenberg Traurig’s California Labor and Employment

On Sept. 15, join GT Data, Privacy & Cybersecurity Shareholder David Zetoony and Associate Karin Ross for their myLawCLE presentation, “What Is Considered Sensitive Personal Information?”, co-sponsored with the Federal Bar Association.

The term “sensitive personal information” is often referred to in contracts, regulatory guidance, and policy documents. What constitutes sensitive personal information,