No.

The regulations implementing the CCPA require that in-scope businesses must provide two or more designated methods of submitting requests to opt-out, including an interactive form accessible via a clear and conspicuous link titled “Do Not Sell My Personal Information,” on the business’s website or mobile application.[1]

In addition to the “DNSMPI” link noted

No.

The regulations implementing the CCPA require that if a business sells personal information and collects personal information from consumers online it must honor “user-enabled global privacy controls” that communicate a desire of the consumer to opt-out of the sale of personal information.[1]  There is no single format or technical specification for creating, transmitting,

No.

The European GDPR permits a company to retain personal data for “no longer than is necessary for the purposes for which the personal data are processed.”[1]  As a result, if a company no longer needs information to accomplish a specific purpose, the company is, theoretically, required to delete that information.  The requirement that

No.

The European GDPR permits a company to collect only that information which is “adequate, relevant and limited to what is necessary in relation to the purposes” for which the information is to be processed.”[1]  As a result, a company arguably is not permitted to collect personal data that is not “necessary” for a

The term “personally identified information” is utilized by some industry groups, including the Network Advertising Initiative (“NAI”).  Personally identified information, or “PII,” is defined by such organizations to refer to a significantly narrower set of data than the term “personal information” used within the CCPA.  The following provides a side-by-side comparison of the two terms:

Yes and no.

The CCPA references directly, or by incorporating definitions from other code provisions, 55 data types that may fall under the broad definition of “personal information.”  While the CCPA does not label any data type as being more, or less, sensitive than another, the Act does confer special rights on a subset of

On Aug. 30, 2020, the California legislature passed Assembly Bill 1281 (AB-1281), which would extend the exemptions for “employee” information and business-to-business (B2B) transactions from its original expiration date of Jan. 1, 2021, to Jan. 1, 2022, if approved by the governor.

Read the full GT Alert, “Extension to CCPA’s Employment and

On August 14, 2020, the California Attorney General (AG) announced that the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) approved the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations, which will take effect immediately. The OAL’s approval concludes the expedited review process requested by the AG on June 1. For more information on the review process, see GT’s June

It has been a busy time for the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)—enforcement begins July 1st, final implementing regulations have been submitted for approval, and qualifying signatures for a wide-ranging “CCPA v2.0” ballot initiative are in the process of being counted.

Yet the effect of the CCPA on digital advertising, mobile applications and websites remains