On Jan. 27, 2023, the California Attorney General announced his office is investigating and sending letters to businesses in the retail, travel, and food industries with popular mobile apps that allegedly are not in compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) by failing to offer a consumer opt-out mechanism for sales, or honor rights

The CCPA and its implementing regulations identify six types of information requests that a consumer can submit to a business. As the first five requests ask that a business respond with broad information about the type of information collected (as opposed to the actual information itself), they are often referred to as category-level access requests.

Jan. 1 is approaching, and with it comes new requirements under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CPRA) and the Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act (VCDPA). What should you and your company be focusing on to ensure you are prepared for the looming compliance deadline? This Data Privacy Dish post offers end-of-year considerations for closing out

After Europe blazed the trail by passing the sweeping General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) in 2016, California followed closely in the footsteps of European efforts by passing the most comprehensive data privacy law in the United States, the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “CCPA”). Effective January 1, 2020, the CCPA provided a number of obligations

GT Shareholders Gretchen A. Ramos and Darren Abernethy will lead a webinar hosted by the Association of Corporate Counsel titled “Website and Mobile App Compliance Under the CPRA and New State Privacy Laws Effective in 2023” Oct. 6 at 11 a.m. PDT.

Starting Jan. 1, 2023, the California Privacy Rights Act and the CPRA

On July 8, 2022, the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) released proposed regulations to implement the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”). The new proposals would dramatically change the existing regulations that apply to organizations that do business in California.

Click here to read the full article, published by the Washington Legal Foundation Aug. 19, 2022.

Some modern data privacy statutes mandate that organizations allow third parties – who are authorized by a data subject – to submit access, deletion, correction, or other requests on behalf of a consumer. Such third parties are sometimes referred to as “authorized agents” – a term created by the regulations implementing the CCPA. The following

Several modern state data privacy statutes refer to precise geolocation information as a “sensitive” category of personal information. What constitutes precise geolocation information differs slightly between and among states. The following table provides a side-by-side comparison of the how the states have defined the term.

Click here for a side-by-side comparison of the how the

Most modern state data privacy laws exempt from their definition of personal information “publicly available information.” What constitutes publicly available information differs between state privacy laws and may not correlate to the lay definition understood by many businesses and individuals. For example, while some businesses may consider information available on the internet “publicly available information

As more children spend their time online exploring and learning, government bodies in the United States and internationally have enacted policies to ensure safer spaces, privacy, security, and protection for children online. The California Senate Judiciary Committee recently voted to advance two California bills to protect children’s online activities.

Closely modeled after the UK’s Children’s