consumer data collection

Consumers are permitted to bring suit under the CCPA if they can prove the following five elements:

  1. A business incurred a data breach;
  2. The data breach involved a sensitive category of information identified in California Civil Code Section 1798.81.5;
  3. The business had a legal duty to protect the personal information from breach;
  4. The business failed

The CCPA states that a service provider must be contractually prohibited from “retaining, using, or disclosing the personal information [provided to it by a business] for any purpose other than for the business purposes specified in the contract for the business . . . .”1 That prohibition, however, may not apply to information once

Generally, most cookie banners fall within four broad categories:

  1. Notice-Only Cookie Banners. A notice-only cookie banner discloses to website visitors that the website deploys cookies (and potentially other tracking technologies), but the banner does not give the visitor any direct control concerning the use of cookies. In other words, the website visitor is not

The CCPA and its implementing regulations identify six types of information requests that a consumer can submit to a business. As the first five requests ask that a business respond with broad information about the type of information collected (as opposed to the actual information itself), they are often referred to as category-level access requests.