No.

The regulations implementing the CCPA only require that a business utilize reasonable security in the context of personal information collected or processed for specific purposes – i.e., consumer requests and information provided in response to access requests. The Office of the Attorney General (OAG) has stated that what constitutes “reasonable security measures” in these

The CPRA, which modified the CCPA, uses the term “right to know” and “right to access” synonymously.1 The regulations implementing the CCPA use the phrase “request to know” exclusively. Most data privacy attorneys use the term “access rights” and requests for such information as “access requests,” as those terms have historically been used within

The CCPA and its implementing regulations identify six types of information requests that a consumer can submit to a business. As the first five requests ask that a business respond with broad information about the type of information collected (as opposed to the actual information itself), they are often referred to as category-level access requests.

No.

A privacy policy typically discloses the following information to the public:

  • The categories of information collected from a data subject directly and from third parties about a data subject,
  • The purpose for which information is collected and used,
  • The ability (if applicable) of a data subject to opt out of their information being sold,

No.

The CPRA created a new sub-category of personal information that it labels “sensitive personal information.” [1] The sub-category is comprised of twenty specific data fields which include, among other things, the religious beliefs, racial origin, precise geolocation, and sexual orientation of a consumer. Beginning on January 1, 2023, consumers will have the right to

The CCPA did not explicitly label any data type as being more, or less, “sensitive” than another, although it did confer special data security-related rights on a subset of data types.

The CPRA created a new sub-category of personal information that it labels “sensitive personal information.” [1] The sub-category is comprised of twenty specific data

Not specifically. While the CPRA will require businesses whose processing poses a “significant risk” to consumers’ privacy or security to conduct an annual risk assessment and submit it to the newly-created California Privacy Protection Agency, the CPRA does not require that businesses appoint a “Chief Privacy Officer” or similar individual responsible for compliance with the

No.

The CPRA created a new sub-category of personal information that it labels “sensitive personal information.” [1]  The sub-category is comprised of twenty specific data fields which include, among other things, the religious beliefs, racial origin, precise geolocation, or sexual orientation of a consumer.  Beginning on January 1, 2023, if a business collects sensitive personal

The CCPA’s core requirements can be grouped broadly into three categories: (1) rights owed by businesses to Californians concerning their personal data, (2) data security breach risks and obligations, and (3) vendor management.

The CPRA expanded the scope of the first category – i.e., the rights conferred upon Californians concerning their personal data. Under the

No.

The regulations implementing the CCPA require that in-scope businesses must provide two or more designated methods of submitting requests to opt-out, including an interactive form accessible via a clear and conspicuous link titled “Do Not Sell My Personal Information,” on the business’s website or mobile application.[1]

In addition to the “DNSMPI” link noted