Most modern state data privacy laws exempt from their definition of personal information “publicly available information.” What constitutes publicly available information differs between state privacy laws and may not correlate to the lay definition understood by many businesses and individuals. For example, while some businesses may consider information available on the internet “publicly available information

Some organizations are confused as to the impact that pseudonymization has (or does not have) on a privacy compliance program. That confusion largely stems from ambiguity concerning how the term fits into the larger scheme of modern data privacy statutes. For example, aside from the definition, the CCPA only refers to “pseudonymized” on one occasion

The Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act, which is scheduled to go into effect in 2023, states that a consumer has the right to “opt out of the processing of the personal data for purposes of [] targeted advertising . . . .”1 Unlike other state statutes, such as the CPRA, the Virginia Consumer Data

The Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act (GLBA) and its implementing regulations impose privacy requirements when financial institutions collect “nonpublic personal information about individuals who obtain financial products or services primarily for personal, family, or household purposes.”[1] GLBA does not apply, however, when a financial institution collects information about individuals “who obtain financial products or services for business,

Colorado is the third state, after California and Virginia, to get a comprehensive data privacy statute through its legislature. While the Colorado Privacy Act (CPA) awaits signature by Gov. Polis, businesses are assessing to what extent the CPA will impact their privacy programs.

The following provides a high-level cross-reference to help companies compare and contrast

On Thursday, May 20 at 8:00 a.m. PST (11:00 a.m. EST), Gretchen Ramos, global co-chair of Greenberg Traurig’s Data, Privacy & Cybersecurity Practice, will be a panelist at the Global Privacy Summit Online 2021 Expert Bar session, titled “CCPA, CPRA & CDPA: Implementation Tips & Tricks.” The session will provide practical considerations for passed

Some privacy statutes explicitly reference “sensitive” or “special” categories of personal information. While such terms, when used, often include similar data types that are generally considered as raising greater privacy risks to data subjects if disclosed, the exact categories that fall under those rubrics differ between and among statutes. Furthermore, other privacy statutes do not

On March 2, 2021, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam signed the Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act (CDPA) into law, making Virginia the second state to have comprehensive data privacy legislation on the books. The CDPA is similar to the privacy regime enacted under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and expanded under the California Privacy Rights

Virginia is poised to be the second state, after California, to pass comprehensive data privacy legislation. The Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act passed the Senate and the House of Delegates on Feb. 24, 2021, and now awaits the approval of Governor Northam.

Although the Virginia statute will not take effect until Jan. 1, 2023, companies

In the wake of the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) and an updated Nevada privacy law that took effect in October 2019, states are wasting no time in 2020 introducing new privacy laws of their own.

Joining the chorus of Virginia and Florida, this month state lawmakers in New Hampshire,