Following much anticipation, the Office of the California Attorney General (OAG) moved one step closer to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)’s wide-ranging implementing regulations becoming enforceable by law by filing the final CCPA Regulations with the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL) on June 1.

The CCPA grants the OAG the authority to begin

Regulators’ enforcement priorities evolve alongside technological changes and in response to consumer-impacting activities that are emphasized in news headlines. This trend can be seen in the SEC’s relatively recent focus on monitoring and bringing formal actions against opportunistic stock trading by corporate insiders who have knowledge of enterprise security incidents and data breaches.

As the SEC described in its 2018 guidance intended to assist public companies in preparing disclosures about cybersecurity risks and incidents: “Companies and their directors, officers, and other corporate insiders should be mindful of complying with the laws related to insider trading in connection with information about cybersecurity risks and incidents, including vulnerabilities and breaches.”

What follows is an overview of an article published in Cybersecurity Law Report (subscription paywall) last week by Greenberg Traurig’s Darren Abernethy regarding the interplay between corporate insider trading and cybersecurity incidents, including some possible planning steps for businesses to consider with legal counsel.
Continue Reading Insider Trading in the Data Breach Context: Proactive Corporate Planning and Regulatory Enforcement

With the California Attorney General’s enforcement of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) beginning on July 1, 2020, businesses are eagerly awaiting the forthcoming final version of the CCPA Regulations to ensure that their compliance is in line with the law and its Regulations. Due to the upcoming CCPA enforcement deadline, and California’s shelter-in-place status,

In an April 8 letter to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Senator Edward Markey (D-MA) urged the FTC to issue formal privacy and cybersecurity guidance for companies engaged in producing online conferencing services, and best practices for users of such services. This request comes in response to an exponential increase in the usage of videoconferencing

Introduction

As many countries reach the second stage of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, privacy protections may be relaxed under certain circumstances. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) issued a statement on the processing of personal data in this period of time, and several national data protection authorities have issued COVID-19 specific

While many companies across the United States transition to remote working, scammers are taking this opportunity to target vulnerable and unsuspecting employees. Some emails and websites promising information about keeping safe from, and offering resources for, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have turned out to be scams that push malware, ransomware, and disinformation, or

Today, the California Office of the Attorney General (OAG) released a second set of modifications to its proposed California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) Regulations.

The proposed regulations were first published and noticed for public comment on October 11, 2019. On February 10, 2020, the OAG released modifications to the proposed regulations based on the earlier

Despite being in effect since Jan. 1, 2020, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) continues to generate confusion for employers of California residents. Much attention has been given to the CCPA’s effect on a business’ obligations in collecting, using, and sharing California customers’ data. However, given the CCPA’s broad “consumer” definition includes “employees,” it also imposes duties on any in-scope business that manages California employees’ data. Notably, under the CCPA, “employees” include job applicants. The CCPA thus applies to both California customers and employees/job applicants of any “business,” which is defined as a for-profit organization doing business in California that controls how personal information is processed and: (i) has gross annual revenue exceeding $25 million; (ii) buys, receives, sells, or shares personal information of 50,000 or more California consumers, households, or devices; or (iii) derives 50% or more of its annual revenue from selling personal information of California residents. Civ. Code § 1798.140(c)(1). Importantly, for the CCPA to apply, businesses do not have to be physically in California. Thus, for example, a business that does not have any facilities in California, but employs remote workers in California, could be subject to the CCPA if it meets the CCPA’s “business” definition.
Continue Reading Employers: Stop, Drop, and Ensure CCPA Compliance as to Employees Residing in California

In August 2018, Brazil took a significant step by passing comprehensive data protection legislation: the General Data Protection Law (Lei Geral de Proteção de Dados Pessoais – Law No. 13,709/2018, as amended) (LGPD). The substantive part of the legislation takes effect August 16, 2020, leaving fewer than six short months for companies to prepare.