A controller refers to the entity that determines the “purpose and means” of how personal data will be processed. Determining the “purpose” of processing refers to deciding why information will be processed. Determining the “means” of processing refers to deciding how information will be processed.1 That does not necessarily mean, however, that a controller

A controller refers to the entity that determines the “purpose and means” of how personal data will be processed. Determining the “purpose” of processing refers to deciding why information will be processed. Determining the “means” of processing refers to deciding how information will be processed.1 That does not necessarily mean, however, that a controller

A controller refers to the entity that determines the “purpose and means” of how personal data will be processed. Determining the “purpose” of processing refers to deciding why information will be processed. Determining the “means” of processing refers to deciding how information will be processed.1 That does not necessarily mean, however, that a controller

Some privacy statutes explicitly reference “sensitive” or “special” categories of personal information. While such terms, when used, often include similar data types that are generally considered as raising greater privacy risks to data subjects if disclosed, the exact categories that fall under those rubrics differ between and among statutes. Furthermore, other privacy statutes do not

A controller refers to the entity that determines the “purpose and means” of how personal data will be processed. Determining the “purpose” of processing refers to deciding why information will be processed. Determining the “means” of processing refers to deciding how information will be processed.[1] That does not necessarily mean, however, that a controller

A controller refers to the entity that determines the “purpose and means” of how personal data will be processed. Determining the “purpose” of processing refers to deciding why information will be processed. Determining the “means” of processing refers to deciding how information will be processed.1 That does not necessarily mean, however, that a controller

Parties to an international arbitration, their lawyers, the tribunal members and the arbitral institution have numerous data protection obligations, which may compete and overlap, creating a complex compliance framework, especially in disputes that typically involve a significant amount of personal data, such as large-scale construction, technology and digital information disputes.

In March 2020, the International

The terminology used by the ISO 29100 privacy framework arguably most closely aligns with the terminology used under the GDPR. The following chart provides a side-by-side comparison of commonly used terms and concepts as they appear in the European GDPR, the California CCPA, and the newly passed Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act.

ISO 29100 Europe

The terms “pseudonymize” and “pseudonymization” are commonly referenced in the data privacy community, but their origins and meaning are not widely understood among American attorneys. Most American dictionaries do not recognize either term.1 While they derive from the root word “pseudonym” – which is defined as a “name that someone uses instead of his

Deidentified information is defined within the CCPA to refer to information that “cannot reasonably identify, relate to, describe, be capable of being associated with, or be linked, directly or indirectly, to a particular consumer” provided that a business that uses deidentified information takes four operational and organizational steps to ensure that such information is not