California Consumer Privacy Act

  1. EEA Cross-Border Transfers. The U.S. and the EU will work towards, and hopefully reach, a cross-border data transfer solution.
  2. Ransomware. More ransomware attacks and increased regulatory scrutiny of companies that pay ransom demands.
  3. Digital Advertising. Development of alternate marketing strategies, and perhaps more reliance on consumer opt-in, as privacy laws further erode traditional tracking

One week into the final month of what has been a memorable 2020, maintaining an organization’s privacy hygiene is more pressing than ever – and includes new requirements.

From privacy policy updates mandated by the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), to all businesses needing to stay current and non-deceptive in their public disclosures in relation

The CCPA did not explicitly label any data type as being more, or less, “sensitive” than another, although it did confer special data security-related rights on a subset of data types.

The CPRA created a new sub-category of personal information that it labels “sensitive personal information.” [1] The sub-category is comprised of twenty specific data

On June 24, the California Secretary of State announced that the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) has qualified as a statewide ballot initiative to be listed on this November’s General Election ballot.

The announcement follows official confirmation that the nonprofit group behind the ballot initiative, Californians for Consumer Privacy, obtained in excess of the 623,212

Following much anticipation, the Office of the California Attorney General (OAG) moved one step closer to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)’s wide-ranging implementing regulations becoming enforceable by law by filing the final CCPA Regulations with the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL) on June 1.

The CCPA grants the OAG the authority to begin

With the California Attorney General’s enforcement of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) beginning on July 1, 2020, businesses are eagerly awaiting the forthcoming final version of the CCPA Regulations to ensure that their compliance is in line with the law and its Regulations. Due to the upcoming CCPA enforcement deadline, and California’s shelter-in-place status,

Today, the California Office of the Attorney General (OAG) released a second set of modifications to its proposed California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) Regulations.

The proposed regulations were first published and noticed for public comment on October 11, 2019. On February 10, 2020, the OAG released modifications to the proposed regulations based on the earlier

Despite being in effect since Jan. 1, 2020, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) continues to generate confusion for employers of California residents. Much attention has been given to the CCPA’s effect on a business’ obligations in collecting, using, and sharing California customers’ data. However, given the CCPA’s broad “consumer” definition includes “employees,” it also imposes duties on any in-scope business that manages California employees’ data. Notably, under the CCPA, “employees” include job applicants. The CCPA thus applies to both California customers and employees/job applicants of any “business,” which is defined as a for-profit organization doing business in California that controls how personal information is processed and: (i) has gross annual revenue exceeding $25 million; (ii) buys, receives, sells, or shares personal information of 50,000 or more California consumers, households, or devices; or (iii) derives 50% or more of its annual revenue from selling personal information of California residents. Civ. Code § 1798.140(c)(1). Importantly, for the CCPA to apply, businesses do not have to be physically in California. Thus, for example, a business that does not have any facilities in California, but employs remote workers in California, could be subject to the CCPA if it meets the CCPA’s “business” definition.
Continue Reading Employers: Stop, Drop, and Ensure CCPA Compliance as to Employees Residing in California

Today, the California Office of the Attorney General (OAG) released much-anticipated revisions to its proposed implementing regulations to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).

The following were issued by the OAG on its website:

  • A notice of modifications to the text of the proposed regulations;
  • A redlined version of the revised regulations, showing the

Although the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) has only been in effect for a matter of weeks – and its proposed regulations are not yet finalized – it could be overhauled by a new privacy law later this year. Last fall, the group that first formulated the CCPA as a ballot initiative in 2018, Californians