The CCPA Regulations require that businesses that buy, receive, sell, or share personal information about more than 10 million Californians disclose metrics within their privacy notices regarding the quantity of data subject requests that they received in the previous calendar year. Among other things, if a business offers a do not sell my personal information

While there is relatively little publicly available empirical data concerning website visitors’ interactions with cookie banners, the data that does exist indicates that user acceptance rates are significantly greater depending upon how many options are presented to a website visitor. For example, in one study researchers placed a cookie banner on a website that provided

Businesses often struggle with how to display cookie banners given the complexities of conveying information to individuals that may lack technical expertise, and “banner fatigue” – a term which describes the reality that consumers presented with pop-ups and cookie banners across different websites may not spend time to read each banner before attempting to close

On December 10, 2020, the California Attorney General (AG) released the Fourth Set of Proposed Modifications to the California Consumer Protection Act (CCPA) Regulations, styled as “Modifications to Proposed Modifications.” The Fourth Set comes shortly after the comment period for the Third Set of Proposed Modifications closed on Oct. 28.  Per the AG’s Notice

While businesses prepare to comply with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), Nevada has followed California’s lead and has amended its law to provide consumers with the right to opt-out of the “sale” of their personal information by website operators.

The amendment, SB 220, will take effect October 1, 2019, three months before the