Data is typically needed to train and fine-tune modern artificial intelligence (AI) models. AI can use data—including personal information—to recognize patterns and predict results.

The GDPR permits controllers to process personal information if one (or more) of the following six lawful processing purposes applies:[1]

  1. Consent. A company may process personal information if it collects

Greenberg Traurig Shareholder David Zetoony, Co-Chair of the U.S. Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice, will be a panelist during the webinar, “Intersection of Privacy Laws and AI,” Wednesday, Aug. 16 at 12:00 p.m. CT. The webinar will feature privacy professionals exploring the complexities presented by artificial intelligence.

Topics include: 

  • Privacy issues arising from

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) applies to two types of entities – “controllers” and “processors.” 

A “controller” refers to an entity that “determines the purposes and means” of how personal information will be processed.[1] Determining the “means” of processing refers to deciding “how” information will be processed.[2] That does not necessitate

All contracts that used the traditional Standard Contractual Clauses must be updated and repapered by 27 December 2022. To help companies comply with the deadline, Greenberg Traurig’s Data Privacy & Cybersecurity Group has compiled a 90-page guide explaining how to apply the new Standard Contractual Clauses in over 40 different transfer scenarios – ranging from

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June 2021.

Visual Description and Implications
Background. Company A retains Company Z in Country Q to process personal data (e.g., collect personal data from data subjects). Company

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June 2021.

Visual Description and Implications
  • Background. Company A transmits personal data to its processor Company Z, and then instructs its processor to onward transfer the personal

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June of 2021.

Visual

Summary

  • Cross border transfers in the United States don’t need a SCC. Company A is not required under U.S. law or the GDPR to

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June of 2021.

Visual Summary
Overview of situation.  Company A in the EEA retains Company Z-1 in the US to process personal data.  Company Z-1 intends to

The following is part of Greenberg Traurig’s ongoing series analyzing cross-border data transfers in light of the new Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission in June of 2021.

Visual Summary
  • 1st Transfer: SCC Module 2. Initial cross-border transfer from EEA to Country Q utilizes the SCC Module 2 designed for transfers from

Gretchen A. Ramos is quoted in a Cybersecurity Law Report article titled “Navigating Post-Schrems II International Data Transfer Waters: Challenges and TIAs.” The article discusses the challenges companies may face as they complete transfer impact assessments (TIAs) and update their standard contractual clauses (SCCs).

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