In this article, we discuss today’s most prevalent types of ransomware attacks, considerations for whether to make the ransom payment, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) and Treasury’s Office of Foreign Asset Control’s (OFAC) ransomware guidance, and the U.S. government’s efforts in connection with these attacks.

Click here to read the full article, published by

Jena M. Valdetero, co-chair of Greenberg Traurig’s U.S. Data, Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice, presented “Solving the Ransomware Puzzle Do You Have All the Pieces in Place?” on April 25 at the 20th Annual Continuity Insights Management Conference in Louisville, Kentucky.

The session walked through all aspects of preparation for a ransomware attack,

Russia’s attack on Ukraine has resulted in historic and escalating U.S. sanctions, impacting companies who do business with Russia or Russian-affiliates and creating risks even for companies who do not. Since 2020, the number and sophistication of ransomware attacks has spiked, largely perpetuated by organized criminal groups in Russia and Eastern Europe. In light of

On May 6, 2021, Colonial Pipeline was attacked by ransomware suspected to have originated in Eastern Europe or Russia, allowing cyber criminals to penetrate a major utility with significant impact on the entire US eastern seaboard’s economy. From the perspective of vulnerability, the Colonial Pipeline attack was a significant wake-up call–a Pearl Harbor moment for

The Fourth of July is usually reserved for fireworks, and this year was no different. On July 2, 2021, Kaseya, a provider of IT and security-management solutions, announced that it was the target of a supply-chain ransomware attack by the REvil/Sodinokibi (REvil) organized ransomware group. Kaseya’s virtual systems/server administrator (VSA) is a server and cloud-based