The CCPA states that a service provider must be contractually prohibited from “retaining, using, or disclosing the personal information [provided to it by a business] for any purpose other than for the business purposes specified in the contract for the business . . . .”1 That prohibition, however, may not apply to information once

The CPRA amended the CCPA’s definition of a service provider such that, beginning Jan. 1, 2023, a service provider could include any person (not just a legal entity), and a service provider could be a business that receives personal information “on behalf of” another business. The CPRA also added the requirement that written contracts contain

Possibly, yes. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has issued draft practical guidance on various types of data breaches to assist companies with identifying situations in which a data security incident may need to be reported to EU supervisory authorities (the government regulator for privacy in various EU member countries).

The EDPB addresses a common

The California Online Privacy Protection Act (CalOPPA) requires operators of some commercial websites to disclose whether they respond to “Web browser ‘do not track’ signals or other mechanisms that provide consumer the ability to exercise choice regarding the collection of personally identifiable information about an individual consumer’s online activities over time and across third-party Web

Possibly. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) issued draft practical guidance on various types of data breaches to assist companies with identifying situations in which a data security incident may need to be reported to EU supervisory authorities (the government regulator for privacy in various EU member countries). In instances of a lost or stolen

In order to be considered a service provider under the CCPA, a legal entity must process personal information “on behalf of a business”[1] and be prohibited by contract from:

  1. Retaining the personal information “for any purpose other than for the specific purpose of performing the services specified in the contract . . . or

A data broker is defined under California law as a business that “knowingly collects and sells to third parties the personal information of a consumer with whom the business does not have a direct relationship.”1 Based upon that definition, to be a data broker, the following five elements must be present:

Elements Description
1.

Possibly. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) issued draft practical guidance on various types of data breaches to assist companies with identifying situations in which a data security incident may need to be reported to EU supervisory authorities (the government regulator for privacy in various EU member countries). The guidance addresses the common scenario of

Maybe not. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) issued draft practical guidance on various types of data breaches to assist companies with identifying situations in which a data security incident may need to be reported to EU supervisory authorities (the government regulator for privacy in various EU member countries).

The EDPB addresses a very common

The California Attorney General was asked to clarify whether the use of “website cookies shared with third parties” constituted the sale of personal information. The Attorney General declined to answer, stating only that whether a particular situation constitutes the sale of information “raises specific legal questions that would require a fact-specific determination, including whether or