In most contexts, employees should have a low expectation of privacy in the workplace. Their computers, desks, and other common areas may be subject to strict company control and their conduct subject to workplace policies. But as we will discuss in an upcoming two-part series on The Performance Review (Greenberg Traurig’s California Labor and Employment

While the CPRA deferred a majority of the CCPA’s employee-related substantive requirements until Jan. 1, 2023, employers are still required to provide employees with a notice at collection.[1] As a result, since Jan. 1, 2020, a notice at collection, which must be provided “at or before the point at which” the collection of information

On Aug. 30, 2020, the California legislature passed Assembly Bill 1281 (AB-1281), which would extend the exemptions for “employee” information and business-to-business (B2B) transactions from its original expiration date of Jan. 1, 2021, to Jan. 1, 2022, if approved by the governor.

Read the full GT Alert, “Extension to CCPA’s Employment and