The CCPA and its implementing regulations identify six types of information requests that a consumer can submit to a business. As the first five requests ask that a business respond with broad information about the type of information collected (as opposed to the actual information itself), they are often referred to as category-level access requests.

Some modern data privacy statutes mandate that organizations allow third parties – who are authorized by a data subject – to submit access, deletion, correction, or other requests on behalf of a consumer. Such third parties are sometimes referred to as “authorized agents” – a term created by the regulations implementing the CCPA. The following

The CCPA Regulations require that businesses that buy, receive, sell, or share personal information about more than 10 million Californians disclose metrics within their privacy notices regarding the speed with which they respond to the data subject requests that they received in the previous calendar year. Among other things, businesses must report the average or

The CCPA Regulations require that businesses that buy, receive, sell, or share personal information about more than 10 million Californians disclose metrics within their privacy notices regarding the quantity of data subject requests that they received in the previous calendar year. Among other things, businesses must publicly report the number of access requests that the

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The CCPA permits consumers to “institute a civil action” only where consumer “nonencrypted or nonredacted personal information” is “subject to an unauthorized access and exfiltration, theft, or disclosure.” [1] The CCPA does not provide a private right of action, nor does it provide statutory damages, if a company violates its obligation to disclose to

The CCPA contains several references to the obligation of a business to, in response to an access request, provide the “specific pieces of personal information” that it has collected about a California resident.1 Each of those sections is modified by California Civil Code Section 1798.130(a)(2), which states that “the disclosure” required by a business