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No.

Based upon a review of the websites of the Fortune 500 conducted approximately one year after the CCPA went into effect, 21.4% of websites included a “do not sell my personal information link.” 78.6% of websites did not include a link to opt out of the sale of personal information.1 A review of the websites of the Fortune 500 conducted in December 2019, immediately prior to the CCPA going into effect, showed that among companies that had already updated their websites to account for the CCPA, 18% had included a “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” link. Throughout the course of 2020 that number rose only three percentage points to 21.4%.2


1 Review was conducted over the fourth quarter of 2020 by Greenberg Traurig LLP based upon companies that had been listed within the Fortune 500 as of 2019.
2 Id.

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Photo of David A. Zetoony David A. Zetoony

David Zetoony, Co-Chair of the firm’s U.S. Data, Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice, focuses on helping businesses navigate data privacy and cyber security laws from a practical standpoint. David has helped hundreds of companies establish and maintain ongoing privacy and security programs, and he

David Zetoony, Co-Chair of the firm’s U.S. Data, Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice, focuses on helping businesses navigate data privacy and cyber security laws from a practical standpoint. David has helped hundreds of companies establish and maintain ongoing privacy and security programs, and he has defended corporate privacy and security practices in investigations initiated by the Federal Trade Commission, and other data privacy and security regulatory agencies around the world, as well as in class action litigation.

David receives regular recognitions from clients and peers for his knowledge and experience in the fields of data privacy and security. The National Law Journal named him a “Cybersecurity and Data Privacy Trailblazer,” JD Supra recognized him four times as one of the most widely read names when it comes to data privacy, cyber security, or the collection and use of data, and Lexology identified him six times as the top “legal influencer” in the area of technology, media, and telecommunications in the United States, the European Union, and in the context of cross-border transfers of information. He is the author of the American Bar Associations primary publication on the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and is writing the American Bar Associations primary publication on the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).